I found this article through STFU, Parents that tells about a mother of five who is pursuing a master’s degree and brought her infant with her the first day of class, only to be told that bringing infants to class was against college policy. “I just didn’t even think it would be a problem,” she said–so imagine her shock when it was.

The STFU, Parents lady (whose name I forget) pointed out that the mom in question was a BYU graduate, “so that explains a lot.” Ha ha, yes. Yes, it does. Even so, this mom said that back at the BYU, there were “occasionally” children in class. She didn’t say children were a regular feature of BYU classrooms, and yet she showed up her first day of class with an infant and all her baby gear in tow, not because of any childcare emergency, but because she just “didn’t even think it would be a problem,” implying that she was just intending to bring her infant to class every time–presumably because she’s breastfeeding, and that would be more convenient (for her). (And the baby, of course.)

I have mixed feelings about this because on the one hand, it’s nice when people accommodate mothers, particularly breastfeeding mothers. It’s nice when women are able to get some work done along with caring for their infants, who don’t always need intense, one-on-one attention. I learned how to do a lot of things one-handed (including diaper changes) when Mister Bubby was an infant because the little dude always had to be held. I had to hold him always. I call him the “little dude” because “little bastard” seems a little harsh, at least in retrospect. At the time he was pretty much ruining my life. Well, anyway–point being, he was happy (i.e., quiet) as long as he was being held, so in theory I could have gone to a college class and taken notes (I only write with one hand anyway) while holding him. I can see why maybe a mom would think it would work to take a baby to class, especially if the baby in question were one of those “easy” babies I’ve heard so much about. It’s nice when people see babies and children as just part of normal life–rather than the part of life that has to be walled off from all the other parts of life. Say what you will about Sarah Palin (for example), but I loved seeing pictures of her carrying her baby in a sling whilst carrying on the business of being governor. (I often wonder what might have happened in an alternate universe where Sarah Palin remained governor of Alaska and John McCain just picked some random white dude to be his running mate. But that’s getting off the subject.)

So there’s that, on the one hand. On the other hand, I’m hip to the fact that there are some places babies just don’t belong. I’ve never been one of those people who gets upset when folks have adults-only events, for example. (I don’t mean “adults-only” like an orgy or something, but every time I write or say “adults-only,” I feel like I have to clarify that I only mean that just adults are welcome.) Frankly, I have always been the type to prefer adults-only events to bring-the-whole-family events because so often bring-the-whole-family events turn into manage-your-kids-in-a-novel-environment-until-finally-it’s-time-to-go-home-THANK-GOD events. When I couldn’t get a babysitter (which was often), my attitude was “doesn’t it suck that I can’t get a babysitter,” not “doesn’t it suck that people won’t let me bring my kids.” When given the choice, I always opt not to bring my kids. We’re all happier that way.

In general, I think people could stand to be more patient with kids, and also with parents of kids, because kids happen and that’s life. I don’t think people are entitled to a child-free environment at all times. If you want to live in society, you should be willing to put up with some babies and kids, even the ill-behaved ones, because we all start out as kids, some of us were ill-behaved, and most of us grow out of it but not until we learn to behave better (or just get older). Parents shouldn’t be expected to keep their kids at home until they are perfect. Not only is it unrealistic, it wouldn’t result in raising good, productive citizens. Kids need to be out in the world and exposed to different situations, and the rest of us just need to suck it up and deal with some occasional crying, whining, or other disruption.

HOWEVER, parents do need to be considerate of other people’s needs. There are situations where bringing your child(ren)–who are apt to cause some disruption–is just plain rude. Sometimes people bring their babies to movie theaters, which I guess I don’t have a problem with provided the baby sleeps the whole time. (I do wonder about the effects of the Dolby Surroundsound on their little ears–movie theaters can be loud.) I myself would never have dared to bring an infant to a movie theater because a) there was no freaking way a baby of mine would sleep the whole time and b) assuming I did have a baby who slept all the time, it would be just my luck that the one day I choose take them to the movie theater would be the one day they decided they had colic or something. That is how my minds works. In general, I don’t think babies belong at movie theaters or concerts or plays or other entertainment events that are intended for adult, i.e. able to sit still and not make noise, audiences. If they just sleep the whole time, awesome. Congratulations, your baby is awesome! I am retroactively jealous of you. But if they start crying and you don’t leave, you’re being rude.

(None of this applies to a family-friendly movie, concert, or play or whatever. Unless your baby is really really super loud and you don’t leave. Then you’re being rude to all the other babies and kids who are trying to disrupt the show in their own ways.)

Sometimes it’s impossible to avoid disrupting other people’s lives. Sometimes you just have to take a baby or young child on an airplane. I know, I’ve done it. Lots and lots of times. And believe me, karma has paid me back SIXTEEN-FOLD for all the times I, as a young childless adult trying to sleep on red-eye flight from Los Angeles to Greensboro, NC, resented all the babies who were flying (and not sleeping) with me. Sometimes babies cry. Sometimes children throw fits in stores. Sometimes they make messes when they ought not to. Blah blah, I’m cool with the fact that sometimes babies and children just suck. Let me tell you: now that I no longer have young children of my own, there is no greater feeling than to witness a child misbehaving in public and being able to say, “Ahh, not my problem.” IT’S AWESOME. But back to the point–I get that disruption-by-child is a part of life. No one is entitled to escape, even if they never had or don’t plan on ever having children. If you were once a child, you owe some kids and their parents a little slack. BUT if you don’t anticipate the possibility that your baby or child might be disruptive or otherwise somehow inconvenience others, and your attitude is always “they should just suck it up,” you’re being inconsiderate and narcissistic. The world doesn’t revolve around you or your special snowflake.

I don’t doubt that the mother in this article had planned and prepared to make class time with her baby go as smoothly as possible. Maybe it would have gone smoothly. And the more women are allowed to keep their babies with them (and not have to hire a sitter), the more opportunities women will have. So my inner feminist is very sympathetic to letting moms bring their babies to class. But I’m also sympathetic to people who argue that they paid to be in this class too and they don’t appreciate someone just assuming they can bring a baby–an obvious and predictable distraction–to class. (Everyone who commented on this article was sympathetic to people who have childcare emergencies and maybe have to bring their kid to class once, but no one liked the idea of just routinely bringing kids to class, which is the issue the above article and this blog post are addressing.) So I’m conflicted.

Would a baby distract me? Eh, maybe not. I’m used to that sort of thing. Would it have distracted me back in the day when I was not yet used to these things? Not sure, but possibly. I honestly don’t know. I went to a Baptist college and no one brought their babies to class. On the other hand, I go to church with Mormons every Sunday, and say what you will about Mormons, but we’re very accepting of babies and young children. As a result, our services all have a generous amount of background noise. (Unless you’re in one of those rare congregations that is short on young children, in which case it’s like being at a funeral, only less interesting.) I’m not usually distracted by anyone’s children not my own. They have to be really, really loud. But I know other people are more sensitive. (My childless teenage daughter, for example–not that she has any room to complain, as she has historically been the most disruptive individual in the chapel, long after the time when such behavior could be excused as youthful exuberance. But that’s another story.)

So I’m ambivalent. What do you gentle readers think? Is it cool for someone to bring their baby to class, as a matter of course (ha ha, get it, COURSE)? Or should they suck it up and get a sitter, just as common courtesy? I can’t quite decide.

In the United States, there are 321 million people, and (it is estimated) about 347 million guns. In case you were wondering, that is a lot of guns. Other countries don’t have that many guns. One thing that helps a lot, if you don’t want so many guns in your country, is not to allow citizens to own guns. When it’s illegal to own guns, fewer people own them, and strangely enough, fewer guns are in circulation. (Because who’s going to buy your illegal guns? Criminals? No, the criminals will probably just steal them.) Fewer guns also translates to less gun violence, because the fewer guns there are, the harder they are to come by. You can’t use a gun if you can’t get one.

In the U.S., people are allowed to own guns. They’ve always been allowed to own guns, so this has resulted in a lot of guns being produced and sold in the U.S. (Because who’s going to buy your legal guns? Hint: not just criminals.) Although there are laws about who can buy guns and who can sell guns and where and how, etc., in many places it is relatively easy to buy a gun legally, if you want one. Regardless of where you live, however, and what the gun laws are in that jurisdiction, it is always easy to get a gun illegally because there are so many guns. All you have to do is be willing to break the law. Studies have shown that murderers are more willing to break the law than non-murderers. If there were fewer guns, it would be harder to get one, legally or illegally, and therefore harder for murderers to obtain and use guns. So murderers would definitely end up opting for different weapons–in many cases, less destructive weapons–and there would certainly be less gun violence.

So the solution to the U.S.’s gun violence problem is actually quite simple. You can’t just make guns harder to get legally. You have to make them hard to get illegally. That is, you have to make them hard to get, period. The way to do that is to reduce the number of guns in the country. I have an idea of how to do that. It’s actually here in this status update. I’ve already said it. I’m not going to bother to say it again. Suffice it to say that regardless of their personal feelings about guns, most people are reluctant to endorse this simple, obvious strategy because it will require a constitutional amendment. Constitutional amendments are non-starters, politically, but also, advocating for them makes you look like an extremist and very few people think of themselves as extremist. But is it wrong to be an extremist on the side of reducing gun violence? That’s the question Americans have to ask themselves. Not “how can we prevent mass shootings?” We already know the answer to that one. We just don’t like it.

Well, I missed blogging on Tuesday, but I posted something at BCC and I’ve decided that counts. But guess what I did today. Actually, not much. I didn’t do much yesterday either, but I suppose if I’m going to blog every day no matter what, it doesn’t matter what I did when.

Actually, I’m trying to remember what I did yesterday. It seems so long ago. I can tell you what I meant to do but didn’t: clean the house. I mean, I never meant to clean the whole house, but some of it, sure. But I didn’t clean any of it. I barely unloaded the dishwasher and washed a load of towels. And yet I managed to kill six hours while my kids were in school. Well, some of that I spent writing the BCC post, but surely not all of it. Surely not! (If I can’t knock out a mediocre blog post in less than six hours, I may as well give it up right now.) Hm. There appears to be more than eighteen missing minutes on this tape. Maybe I should redirect your attention somewhere else.

Something I absolutely do remember from yesterday, for I still bear the scars, is that in the morning I went out to fetch something from the trunk of my husband’s car before he drove off to work with it (again), and I slipped and scraped my knee on the driveway. It sounds minor when I put it that way, but I assure you, it hurt like a melon farmer. Still does, actually. It looks gnarly. Fortunately, I don’t have to look at it as much as I have to feel it. Unfortunately, it has made me even less inclined to get down on my hands and knees and sort through the many layers of debris that have accumulated on my downstairs floors. I can’t vacuum or sweep again until I clear the debris! I would actually prefer to clear the debris with a backhoe, but that’s probably not the right attitude. I should have an attitude of realism. What that would involve, I don’t know. Aside from getting on my hands and knees and sorting through it systematically, which of course I can’t do because I am such a delicate flower right now. (Seriously, you should see the size of this bandage. It’s hardcore.)

Today Sugar Daddy took me to lunch and I ate too much and then I did some dishes and folded some laundry and washed some more laundry and I took Mister Bubby to Taco Bell before taking him to his four-hour band practice (really) and then I made dinner, of which I ate very little, and then I went to the Moonstruck Chocolate Cafe and had a milkshake because I wanted to and I wrote some crap that may or may not be any good and then I came home and I’m writing this.

SD and I might go watch Hannibal now. I’m tired.

Somewhere in the middle of writing that rambling screed on Saturday, I decided that I should try blogging every day, even if it’s stupid, just to get back into the habit of writing again. Well, I didn’t blog yesterday because I didn’t have time. I mean, I was kind of legitimately busy during most of my waking hours. But that’s just one day I’ve missed so far. See, it’s only Monday, and it’s still Monday, and here I am blogging. Even though it’s stupid. You know what’s really stupid? Trying to blog on your phone. I did that earlier because all the computers, including my own, had been taken over by the kids. Not recommended. Blogging on your phone, I mean. Also, letting the kids take your computer. I mean, it’s yours, dammit, you should be able to use it whenever you crapping well feel like it, am I right? Well, whatever. They’re all in bed now, and here I am, so let’s go forward.

Guess what I did today. You’ll never guess, so I’ll just tell you. I went to my first clogging practice since June. In olden times of yesteryear, our clogging group used to perform at the county fair, so we would meet through the summer until after the fair, at which time we would break until school started up again. So we’d be off for four or five weeks, depending on when Labor Day fell. But the last couple years we haven’t performed at the fair, and without an upcoming performance to practice for, continuing to meet during the summer seemed more inconvenient than necessary. Unfortunately, that means that instead of a four-to-five-week hiatus, we have a twelve-week hiatus. I always say I’m going to keep practicing during the hiatuses, so I stay in shape and don’t forget the routines, but do I ever do this? No. Never. Never! It’s just like with the housekeepers. I need a schedule, or I’m useless. I’m not all that useful even with a schedule, but without one I am totally useless.

I was counting on losing that pesky 10-15 pounds I’ve been carrying around for the last…I don’t remember how long it’s been, just that I was counting on losing it when I had my surgery and was forced to stop eating. Well, I did lose between 10 and 15 pounds while I was not eating. I lost all my energy and will to live, too, but at least I was thin! Just kidding. Well, I was, but my values aren’t that screwed up. Since I have been eating again, I’ve gained back all of the weight I lost, but I no longer care because you know what, screw it. I would rather carry around 10-15 extra pounds than live like I did during my recovery period. I’m just going to have to get used to the lumps, because there’s no way in hell I’m going on a diet now. AS GOD IS MY WITNESS, I WILL NEVER BE HUNGRY AGAIN.

This is only tangentially related to clogging, which, now that I am doing it again, I hope will retard the growth of my midsection. Well, I did it this morning for the first time in three months and holy crap, that was painful. About 10 minutes in I wanted to collapse and/or throw up, not necessarily in that order. I didn’t really think I’d been all that sedentary for the last…well, four to six weeks…but of course I had been. My body isn’t going to enjoy this transition from slug to caterpillar. (Yes, I know that slugs don’t normally transition into caterpillars; I was just trying to come up with an example of something that is slow almost to the point of being stationary and also an example of something that is not quite as slow but not exactly fast, either. The latter is my usual metaphor, at least nine months out of the year, with a little break during December.)

After clogging I went grocery shopping. You know, there was a time when I shopped at Target rather frequently. There’s one very close to our house, so it weren’t no thang to just pop on over when I ran out of soap or paper towels or whatever. The problem was that I couldn’t seem to shop there without spending less than $100, regardless of how recently I had just been there. So I decided I really should stop shopping at Target at all unless it was absolutely necessary. To the point where I would buy toilet paper at the grocery store rather than Target, even though it cost more at the grocery store but at least it didn’t cost $100 more. Let me tell you, it worked. The Target Visa bill went way down. However, I am noticing a disturbing new trend: I can’t seem to shop at the grocery store without spending at least $50 or $60. This wouldn’t be a problem if I weren’t shopping at a grocery store every 2-3 days. Sometimes I shop at a grocery store three days in a row and twice in one day. I just need stuff, okay? I forget to buy something and I have to go back.

I only plan meals a couple days at a time anymore because a) I’ve been having difficulty deciding what to make for dinner for the last, I dunno, eight years, and b) yeah, it’s actually just a). Never mind. I can’t decide what to make for dinner tonight, let alone the whole rest of the week, so no, I’m not going to plan out a week’s worth of meals and get my full week’s shopping done all at once. I will plan for one or two, maybe three days if I’m feeling super-ambitious, and I will shop for those particular meals…but also for stuff I can put in the kids’ lunches and stuff that’s on sale and stuff I’m pretty sure we’re out of and will probably need at some inconvenient time when no one can go to the store. On Saturday I went shopping at the WinCo, where I always spend more money because it’s the place where I can buy the cheapest groceries. You see what I did there? Irony! Anyway, on Saturday I went to WinCo to get the food I needed for Sunday, and only Sunday…but I also bought a crap-ton of rice pilaf because we’re always running low on the rice pilaf when we need the rice pilaf and can’t go to WinCo, where it is cheap. Of course, it isn’t that cheap when you buy it by the crap-ton. I mean, it is cheap, by the pound, but absolutely it is not a small expenditure, a crap-ton’s worth. So there was that. Also, some crackers because the kids are always eating all the crackers so there are none left when I want to eat crackers. Or maybe it was just bread. I might have bought the crackers earlier in the week, when I spent $150 and still didn’t know what I was eating for dinner beyond the next day. Whatever. It’s becoming not very cost-effective for me to go grocery shopping. The only problem is I don’t have an alternative venue for buying food. Target, maybe. There’s less of a selection there. BUT THEN THERE’S ALSO PAPER TOWELS AND GARBAGE BAGS AND OTHER THINGS THAT I ALMOST CERTAINLY WILL NEED IN THE FUTURE.

Also, lipstick. Occasionally I go on a lipstick-buying spree because I am still looking for the perfect shade. I’m not sure that it’s out there anymore. Maybe I should only buy lipstick at the 7-Eleven. (I don’t think they sell lipstick at the 7-Eleven, so that would certainly be more cost-effective. And before you say it, no, I don’t drink Slurpees.)

What else did I do today? A little bit of laundry, a little bit of dishes, drove some kids around, made dinner. Started writing this blog. You know, I take it back. You could have probably guessed this much.


I’ve decided that September is a good time to make resolutions, rather than New Year’s, because it’s when the kids all leave the house for a few hours a day and I have some space to think about how I might make life improvements. Also, it’s nearing the end of the year, and if my September resolutions fail, there’s always New Year’s just around the corner.

This decision comes after months of procrastinating–no, make that years. Years of procrastinating getting on with my life now that I’m no longer changing diapers and breastfeeding and cutting up people’s food all my waking hours. Well, I sometimes still cut up people’s food. But not as much as I used to. Technically, I’ve made this decision about a billion times since my youngest started first grade, but it’s the implementation that I’ve procrastinated. Of course, the resolutions are always changing. One day they’re modest, the next unrealistic, the next somewhere in between. The problem is that I can’t seem to accomplish anything, regardless of how small the as-yet-hypothetical accomplishment may seem.

Which means that while I started this post with the intention of talking about resolutions, writing that last paragraph pretty much talked me out of ever trying to do anything ever again.

So if you’ve been wondering what I’ve been up to since I got jaw surgery and fell off the face of the (virtual) earth (or, you might say I virtually fell of the face of the actual earth, I don’t know), that’s pretty much it. When I’m not numbing my pain with frivolous, non-productive activities or the reassuring routine of laundry and dishes, I am more or less losing hope of contributing meaningfully to society ever again.

Since my family is supposed to be more important than anything else I have to do with, hopefully my children will do better with their lives than my own example has taught them. (That was meant to be a sardonic comment, although I do hope my children engage life more successfully than I have. Fortunately, only one of them seems to have inherited my mental instability so far. So, you know, #hopeisalive.)

I’m afraid they’re all going to turn out to be crappy housekeepers. Let me give you a quick update on our experiment with firing the housekeepers: All of my worst fears have come true. I’ve known for the last several years that the main argument for keeping the housekeepers rather than doing the housekeeping myself was the enforced schedule. I knew I could never maintain a schedule on my own. I would need the support of everyone else in the family, and since that support did not seem to be forthcoming, I kept paying professionals to come clean my house even though they sometimes didn’t do such a great job and preparing for their visits was causing me to have mini-nervous breakdowns fortnightly. When the kids took over the bulk of the chores that the housekeepers once did, it seemed to work out pretty well for the first five months. I was astonished, actually, at how well it was working out, and I was so much less stressed than I was when I had the housekeepers.

Then in June I had the jaw surgery, and that was the week I stopped vacuuming regularly. I was absolutely unable to vacuum that week because I was unable to do just about anything but drink things through a straw and lie in bed and be miserable. That was okay. Anyone can afford to skip vacuuming for a couple weeks. Unfortunately, two weeks later I was physically able to vacuum but still very tired and psychologically depressed because I was still in pain, not sleeping well, and the only thing I had to look forward to was drinking chocolate protein shakes. HIGHLIGHT OF MY DAY. So vacuuming was not on my list of things to do because basically nothing was on my list of things to do, including the tidying that should have preceded the vacuuming, including the nagging and threatening of the children that could have substituted for doing all the tidying. If I were a good parent, instead of a hopeless one, I would have insisted that children could not do x (desirable task) before doing y (undesirable task). The trouble was, it was summer, and the kids were always around, and the only thing I wanted more than for them to do their (and my) chores was for them to get out of my face for a while. So if they got invitations to go with friends somewhere, off they went, even if they hadn’t done their chores, because I was too tired and unhappy and hungry to listen to them whine and complain about anything, let alone EVERYTHING.

Eventually, after what felt like the longest six weeks of my life that didn’t include high school P.E., I was able to eat real food again, and that’s when things should have gotten better, since at least I was no longer hungry. If you have enough to eat, you should have enough energy to do whatever needs to be done. Unfortunately, by that time the house was in so much disarray and the constant presence of other people was driving me so crazy that I didn’t even know where or how to start getting everything under control again. The thing about dependent children is that they always need things (hence the term dependent). Every time I thought about cleaning the kitchen (or whatever), I’d think about how I would start doing something and someone would inevitably need me to drive them somewhere or make them a sandwich or play Monopoly with them or explain the meaning of life or whatever, and that would disrupt my flow and everyone’s-just-going-to-mess-it-up-anyway-so-why-bother–and I just wouldn’t begin. Well, there’s no surer way to accomplish nothing than by not beginning in the first place, so you see where I went wrong. I’m not making excuses. I’m explaining myself.

The solutions to my problems are obvious. Even I can see them. It’s the execution that’s elusive. Probably because I’m deliberately avoiding it.

The thing I hate about housework is not the cleaning and scrubbing. (Well, except for the shower and the bathtub. I freaking hate cleaning the shower and the bathtub. I’d rather scrub a million toilets.) Cleaning and scrubbing feel like actual accomplishments. It’s the management of possessions that overwhelms me. Six people live in this house, and I’m in charge of managing all of their possessions. I can already read the comments: “You should not be in charge of managing all of their possessions. Everyone should be responsible for managing their own possessions.” Yes, but you’re describing the world that ought to be, and I’m describing the world that is, so bear with me.

Earlier this year–or maybe it was last year–I read somewhere about a book called The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing, and I got it into my head that I should read it because maybe, unlike every other book about organizing and changing your life, this one would actually be magical. I don’t know what hallucinatory drug I was under at the time–aside from the fact that books about organizing rarely tell me anything I don’t already know, I learned from actually visiting Japan that I don’t have a culturally-Japanese bone in my body–but whatever it was, it couldn’t have been too debilitating because I didn’t actually buy the book, but I put myself on the three-mile-long waiting list at the library because let’s face it, the odds were against it being actually magical. You might say I left it to fate. By the time it was my turn to borrow this allegedly-magical book, I was already completely free of my delusion. In fact, I’d considered taking myself off the waiting list several times, but for some reason I didn’t, and because I actually had the maybe-magic book in my possession now, it seemed foolish not to actually read it.

Well, I read it, and let me tell you, this woman has a lot of great ideas for decluttering and organizing your life if you live alone. I can see it working perfectly for someone who only has to manage her own possessions. It is completely unworkable for someone who has to manage (to at least some extent) six different people’s possessions and whose management style of her own possessions is partially dependent on the fact that she has five other people’s management lifestyles to compensate for. The guiding principle seems profound and life-changing, initially: Don’t keep anything in your life that does not spark joy. Well, sure. Why would you want anything in your life that doesn’t spark joy? Unfortunately, sometimes you don’t have a choice about keeping things in your life that don’t spark joy. She acknowledges this, I think, at some point. I would hate to mischaracterize her writings or her philosophy. I think she accounts for things like toilet paper by reasoning backwards that a life without toilet paper would be significantly less joyful. Not that she actually writes about toilet paper. I’m just giving you an idea of how she might have dealt with such mundane essentials. Unfortunately, there are things other than mundane essentials that must stay in one’s life despite their failure to spark joy and despite their tendency to provoke actual sorrow. Here’s what’s on my living room floor right now:

A socket wrench–does not spark joy, but I assume my husband would be very upset if I just tossed it. I have no idea if my husband is responsible or not for it being on the floor, but there it is.

A three-hole punch–does not spark joy, but my joy is significantly dampened when I find myself, from time to time, needing a three-hole punch and being unable to find one. Up until looking down at the floor just this minute, I had been wondering where this particular three-hole punch had gotten off to. There isn’t a particularly good place for storing it because it’s kind of bulky and doesn’t fit in any drawers because there’s too much other crap in my drawers. I don’t know who left this three-hole punch on the floor, but I would be curious to know where they found it.

A USB cord–does not spark joy because I don’t recognize it as a USB cord to one of the devices that I use. I assume it belongs to one of my husband’s devices, but I don’t know which and I also don’t know why it’s on the floor, unattached to any device.

Princess Zurg’s jacket–sparks joy for Princess Zurg, but often gets left on the floor because it’s too much trouble to put away in the actual coat closet, which is jam chocky full of jackets and coats that spark varying levels of joy among different household members.

A Scooby-Doo Monopoly game and a Duckopoly game–spark joy for Elvis, who loves Monopoly in all its forms. Does not spark joy for me personally, as I dislike Monopoly more than almost any other game on earth, but I assume it’s on the floor because there is not enough room in the game cabinets (yes, we have more than one) to fit all of the Monopoly games we own, let alone all of the other board games we own. Some games are just always going to live on the floor, until we get rid of some games or get rid of some bath towels and bed sheets and convert the linen closet into a game cabinet.

Mister Bubby’s leather portfolio–does not spark joy for me; used to spark joy for Mister Bubby, even though the zipper broke on it about a year or so ago, but he had to switch to an ordinary three-ring binder because the Organizational Nazis at his high school have decreed that everyone needs to have the same organizational system regardless of personality or preference. Granted, this new organizational systems is probably better than his previous organizational system (stuff everything in the leather portfolio until it gets too full and then cull and start over again, looking classy all the while because it’s leather and doesn’t fall apart like your traditional three-ring binder, except for the zipper thing)–but MB has always been very sentimental and doesn’t like to let things go, even after they are no longer of use to him. He also doesn’t like to put things away.

A children’s magazine–does not spark joy for me, but sparks some joy for Girlfriend, who actually reads it. Unfortunately, she likes to keep all of her magazines rather than recycle them (unless she’s actually outgrown them, like with her Thomas the Tank Engine magazine–I tossed a bunch of them last spring, it was awesome). In her defense, she does actually re-read them. However, there is not enough space in this house to store all the reading material any one of us might re-read someday. This is the number one reason I bought a Kindle. Actual books used to spark joy for me, before I started drowning in my own (and everyone else’s) possessions. My Kindle is probably the one thing standing between me and literal suffocation. (Yes, literal. I was an English major. It’s been good for one thing.) It is the one area in which I have been able to stem the tide of material acquisition.

Princess Zurg’s old tap shoes–have always sparked joy for me because they’re cute and remind me of why I took up dancing late in life, but I should probably get over it because Girlfriend’s feet finally got too big to wear them (and theoretically learn to tap dance) and they’re just taking up space on the floor because there isn’t room in our shoe shelves to hold all the shoes we actually wear, let alone the shoes no one can wear. So here is the one object I have named thusfar that actually sparks joy for me, and it is the one object I have decided I should actually get rid of.

I see that this post is now over 2,400 words. If it were hard copy, it would be sucking the joy right the hell out of me.


I have friends all over the political spectrum. There are people I like very much whose political beliefs I think are just crap, and I’m sure they think the same about mine. As I’ve told my children many a time, politics is a stupid thing to lose a friendship over. No matter how much I may disagree with a friend politically, I can always say to myself, “Well, they understand that issue differently,” or “They have a different view of the world than I have.” I don’t get bent out of shape over it. I mean, what’s it to me? It’s not personal. So I say, whoever you’re planning to vote for in 2016, knock yourself out. Metaphorically, of course.

Unless you’re planning to vote for Donald Trump for President of the United States, in which case I want you to literally knock yourself out. LITERALLY, knock yourself out, like, unconscious, before you can vote for Donald Trump for President because you have a serious problem, my friend. A VERY SERIOUS PROBLEM, and you need to be subdued before it gets out of control.

It’s still in the correct location. I am still getting used to it. A couple weeks ago I got the okay to start chewing (a little bit) again. At next week’s check-up I will probably get the okay to do all manner of chewing (at least the kinds I feel like doing). So that’s the state of my jaw. It only hurts sometimes now. Most of the time I am just experiencing the mild discomfort of (what I’ve been assured is temporary) nerve damage. It feels different at different times of day. Sometimes it just feels numb. Other times it feels like when your face starts to wake up after a mega-dose of Novacaine. (That’s not a good feeling, by the way.) Sometimes it just itches. (Which is horrible because scratching does no good because I don’t have actual feeling there.) There is a small area on my chin that feels like someone pressing on a bruise (especially when someone is actually applying pressure to my chin, which is not visibly bruised but maybe is still invisibly bruised, who knows), or sometimes like there’s a huge zit living under my skin. (There could be, but after five weeks it hasn’t shown up yet.)

My lower lip and everything below that (on my face, not my whole body) is starting to be able to sense when something is touching it. Sometimes. Sometimes not. I’ve been told that this can take anywhere from two months to a year to heal. I hope it’s not a year because it’s super annoying. For one thing, it makes drinking from water fountains problematic. How often do I drink from water fountains? Well, before losing feeling in my lower lip, I would have said, “Not very often.” But it turns out that’s not true. Oh, well. There are worse things. Like not being able to eat anything! I can now eat many things, but still not as many as I’d like.

Except last night I got to eat all the things. It was the first time since the surgery that I actually felt overindulged. Sugar Daddy and I went to see Rush at the Moda Center, but before that we got dinner at Tilt, where I had the best hamburger I’ve had since getting the okay to eat hamburgers (I’ve eaten several since then, believe me) and possibly the best hamburger I’ve ever had, I don’t know. It was really good. And they had these awesome tater tots that were probably 1,600 calories each, but don’t worry, I only had, like, four. Plus pie. I’ve missed pie. A la mode. Plus a Coke Zero because I have to watch this girlish figure.

Just kidding. Well, I did lose weight while I was on my no-chewing diet, just as I’d hoped I would. And do you know what I discovered? I discovered that I’d rather be fat. Well, not fat, but ten, fifteen extra pounds? Sure, why not? IT’S SO MUCH BETTER THAN STARVING. I shouldn’t say I was starving because I had ample nutrients, unlike the people in the world who are actually starving. One shouldn’t make light of starvation. That’s another thing I learn while I was going without food.

I don’t really want to talk about my jaw or food anymore, at least not right now. I could tell you about the Rush concert. I must confess that I am but a Rush dilettante, not a connoisseur. But I thought it would be fun to go to their concert with SD, and I was not wrong because THEY WERE AWWWESOOOOME. It was one of the best concerts I’ve been to. It was also my first concert featuring pyrotechnics, so I’m probably officially middle-aged now. I don’t think I’d ever been to a concert that was in a big stadium like that, either. That was pretty crazy. Fortunately, we were close to a bathroom. Also fortunately, the audience was about 80% male, so the line for the ladies’ room wasn’t that long.

UNLIKE the line for the ladies’ room that I waited in (waited in line, not in the ladies’ room, though I suppose part of the time the line was in the actual ladies’ room, so I was waiting there too) at the county courthouse when I had jury duty yesterday. This was my first summons for jury duty since moving to Portland twelve years ago. I haven’t done jury duty since I started having kids because every time I got summoned I was breastfeeding someone. The last time I served was in Los Angeles county, shortly after I was married. I served another time before that, I think when I was 18 or 19. That time I actually served on a jury, which was interesting at the same time that it was boring. I was a little disappointed because the case was so stupid. Not even a drunk driving case, which was most of what went on in that courthouse at the time (probably still is). The defendant was accused of “challenge to fight in public.” Not actually fighting in public, mind you, but challenging someone to fight in public. How does a person come to be arrested for such a thing, you might ask? Well, it’s a long story, but suffice it to say we all agreed that it was lame and we ended up acquitting him because a) it was his word against another dude’s, and b) who cared?

I actually wouldn’t mind serving on a jury again, provided I could do so at my convenience. That’s the problem with jury duty. It never comes up when you have nothing better to do. It’s too bad you can’t volunteer for jury duty, like, “Hey, I’m free this week, howzabout I help you out with one of these trials you’ve got going?” It would certainly liven up my day. Which I think says a lot about my day. The day I’m usually having, that is. The day when I don’t absolutely need to be home by 4:30 so we can drive downtown and eat hamburgers and tater tots and pie a la mode before seeing Rush. As it turned out, I only had to be at the courthouse until 11 a.m. because they ran out of trials for us to be empaneled for. So that was a bonus. The bad news is I have nothing else to do this week but housework, of which there is a lot. I’d rather be at the courthouse. Doing courthouse work. Or not doing it and just reading a book, which was what I did.

I must say that I was impressed by the friendliness of the people working at the courthouse. Even the security people were friendly. It was not at all like being at the DMV. Of course, it is probably a different experience if you’re going to the courthouse to stand trial for something. But whatever. I was thinking yesterday that as poor as my social skills are, I could probably pass as friendly enough to work at the courthouse calling juror numbers and crap. But it’s probably a little late for me to get on that career track.

Just as it’s a little late for me to get on top of the housework again after a month off. I didn’t really take a month off, exactly. I took a couple weeks off, and then I started doing housework again, only I didn’t really start doing it in earnest because I was so tired and depressed all the time because of pain and hunger. I am still not back where I used to be in terms of housekeeping conscientiousness. I am in less pain and am less hungry, but I still get tired easily and also depressed because here is my life: housework. Yes, it is an existential crisis! See, this is what happens when you stop having real problems; you just go back to the stupid #FirstWorldProblems you had before the experience that should have permanently altered your attitude toward life but unfortunately didn’t. I guess this giraffe doesn’t change its spots.

Still too early to tell, technically, but I’m hopeful.

The surgery itself went well. The doctor had to put in a few more screws on one side because my bones are old and brittle. Old bones means it will also take me longer to heal, but that’s to be expected. In what ways does your body not work against you as you get older? Presently it is 4:23 a.m., and I am writing this blog post because it will distract me from the searing pain that cannot be alleviated by narcotics. It’s not always like this. Just during the night, when I’m trying to sleep. During the day, pain comes and goes. Discomfort, on the other hand, is always with me. It’s not debilitating, just demoralizing. Like, now that it’s been a week and I’m allowed to bend at the waist and am not constantly on narcotics, there’s no particular reason why I can’t do the laundry and the dishes and other household chores, except that I don’t feel like it. I don’t know all the “medical” crap that’s going on, but there’s some temporary nerve damage that will take some time to repair. Probably more time because my nerves are old and frayed. Ha ha. That might be a joke, or it might be totally accurate. I don’t know, I’m not a doctor. What I do know is that my entire lower jaw feels like it’s asleep. I can’t feel my lower lip, which actually presents a few daily challenges. Perhaps you can imagine what those are.

That’s uncomfortable. And there’s intermittent pain of varying degrees. It’s unpleasant, but manageable. Until I try to go to sleep, at which point it is extremely distracting. If I’m lucky, I manage to fall asleep before the horrible searing pain starts in. Well, the horrible searing pain wakes me up, but at least I’ve slept a little first. It’s very similar to the pain of an ear infection. Heck, it could be an ear infection for all I know. I really can’t tell. But it’s the horrible searing ear-infection pain plus the horrible dull ache of a jaw that’s been broken and put back together and was exercised too much during the day by doing things like talking, swallowing, opening and closing in order to brush teeth and spit out toothpaste, etc. Nothing touches it. It lasts for a couple, three hours, and then it eventually goes away and all that’s left is my sweet Percocet haze. That’s when I go to sleep. Until then, I just watch Law & Order: SVU and play Spider Solitaire to distract me from the pain. Unfortunately, I can’t read through the pain. Think of all the reading I could get done by not sleeping. But alas.

In other news, I have lost the will to eat. This was what I expected. I didn’t expect to be quite so demoralized by it. I don’t want to eat. I am not tempted to eat anything I ought not because the thought of using my jaw to do anything makes me want to cry. But I didn’t quite realize how not eating would make my life seem so empty. I’m not hungry. Not at all. I have to make myself eat things I don’t want to be eating. But without food, my existence really is quite barren. It’s funny. I’ve joked about these things in the past, but it turns out to be actually true. I would cry, but that would take away the one immediate benefit this surgery has given me: I can breathe much easier now. That’s to be expected, I guess, when you increase your airway by a centimeter. But it’s really quite remarkable. I never realized how compromised my airway was before because that was all I knew. For 44 years I was merely breathing, but now I am BREATHING.

This is why I paid someone to break my jaw and put it back together. Among other things, but those are to be fully realized in the future. For now it’s mainly breathing.

I see the doctor again tomorrow. The swelling has gone down considerably in the last week. I went from looking like Jabba the Hutt to looking like Marlon Brando in the Godfather, but as of now I basically look like Fat Batman. So no, the cosmetic benefits, if there are any, have not yet been realized. But we shall see, gentle readers. We shall see.

Now my pain has gone away and I’m going to fall asleep, if I can possibly ignore whatever stupid bird is chirping outside my window.

One week from today I have my jaw surgery. I’ve been planning this surgery for so long that I forget it isn’t common knowledge among everyone I know that I’m getting it, and I will make some casual reference to having surgery June 10 and people be like WHAT SURGERY!! and when I explain, they all look and/or sound horrified, like they can’t believe I’m about to do something so grotesque. I have always said that I’m looking forward to it being done, not to doing it, but the closer I get to actually doing it, the more nervous I am. And it doesn’t help that everyone around me is horrified at the prospect and it’s not even their jaw in question.

I’ve never had surgery before. I’ve never been under general anesthesia. Now that I’m about to have surgery, I am starting to be scared. Well, last week I was starting. This week I am pretty firmly in the Scared category. Who knows what kind of basket case I’ll be next week. It’s not like I think I’m going to die. Usually I have to be under water before I start considering death as a possibility. Good thing the surgery isn’t going to be performed at sea, I guess. I’m mostly worried that I’m going to have the surgery and regret it later. What if it’s a Monkey’s Paw surgery? It’s supposed to correct my bite and relieve my TMJ symptoms, but what if it doesn’t help? What if it feels weird? What if I look weird? What if my lower jaw randomly comes unhinged at some point in the future? I admit that last one is a long shot. I’m just throwing fears out there. I already know it’s going to hurt like a melon farmer for about a week, but what if it hurts longer? How many weeks before I can chew again? I know what the doctor told me, but I always take what doctors say in terms of recovery and multiply it by at least one and a half. (My orthodontist said I’d be in braces for about two years. That was four years and four months ago, so you see why I have trust issues.) When am I really going to be able to chew again? What if I break my newly-rearranged jaw the first time I eat steak? Worse, what if I break it eating a protein bar, before I’m able to eat steak? What if I have to re-learn how to chew? My lower jaw has never been properly aligned with my upper jaw—how am I supposed to know how that works?

People are surprised to learn that my lower jaw needs to move forward about a centimeter because I don’t have a weak chin. My profile looks normal. Not that people with weak chins—is there a more scientific, PC term for that? I feel like there must be, but as I get older, I’m losing more and more of my words and I have less and less patience for Googling—have abnormal profiles. But if you look at me from the side, you can’t tell that my lower jaw is a centimeter behind where it should be. Which makes me wonder how it will look when it is where it should be. I move my jaw to line up my lower teeth with my upper teeth—which does NOT feel remotely normal, by the way—and I can’t really see a difference, so hopefully I will not end up looking like Jay Leno or something. My dears, I have enough problems.

I am feeling very unattractive as of late, for reasons having nothing to do with my jaw. It has mostly to do with age. I have not aged well. I saw my before pictures at the orthodontist yesterday—that was only four years ago, and I looked so much younger. Not young, not by a long shot, but so much younger. Now I look old, and the frown lines I’ve had since I was five have all gotten more pronounced. I’ve never had a super-great face, but for a long time I did think it looked okay. I would say even at 35-36 it was looking all right. Now I look in the mirror and think, “Who is that hag?” RHETORICAL QUESTION BECAUSE I KNOW. Part of me is holding out hope that somehow, miraculously, I might look better after my surgery. I mean, the insurance company is treating it like the dental equivalent of a boob job, so I feel like I should get some cosmetic benefit. But I don’t imagine I will. Maybe getting rid of the braces will help. I’ve been told that will eventually happen someday too, hopefully before I turn 50.

It is hard to look at Caitlyn Jenner on the cover of Vanity Fair and not feel like that bitch needs to keep her makeover to herself.

The problem with not being young is that whatever you can do to make yourself look better takes a lot more effort than you have the energy for. And probably professional help. I would probably have to go back to school to learn how to be pretty at this point. I’m only focusing on my outward appearance because my soul is empty, just so you know.

But enough of those superficialities. Let’s talk about how the orthodontist has ruined my last week of eating normally for who-knows-how-long by putting new hooks on my braces. I presume they are there for surgery-related purposes. Isn’t it funny how un-curious I was when they were doing this to me at the office yesterday, and it’s only now I can’t eat without feeling like I’ve got razor wire in my mouth that I wonder what the crap this is for? This is why I haven’t made more of my life, you know. A profound lack of curiosity when it matters most. But I digress. Tomorrow I have to see the oral surgeon for a records and x-rays or whatever appointment. I don’t know what’s going to happen to me then. Hopefully nothing horrible. I’m sort of counting on the horrible stuff not starting until next Wednesday. Who wants to take me out for lunch?

Two days after my surgery, school lets out for the summer. Whee! This is where having a mother-in-law who lives half a mile away comes in handy. In case you were wondering, this summer is scheduled to suck. THROUGH A STRAW, FOR ABOUT SIX TO EIGHT WEEKS.

So we are now five months into our No Housekeepers experiment, and I have to say that it is looking less promising than initial data suggested. The bathrooms are starting to get a film. I had to buy a new vacuum cleaner because the Kenmore died RIGHT AFTER I bought new bags for it. Yes, that’s how old our vacuum was—it actually used bags. Now I have a Shark Rocket or something, and I admit, it’s pretty awesome. For a vacuum, I mean. I reckon it can’t help being awesome compared to a fifteen-year-old Kenmore. It makes me feel really old, getting excited about how easily it maneuvers around and under my furniture. I’m like George H.W. Bush marveling at the supermarket scanner. What won’t they think of next. So yes, the floors still look great, because I’m doing them. Actually, they look better because I’m doing them. The stuff the kids are doing, on the other hand, is not quite up to snuff. It’s not cutting the mustard, if you prefer a different outdated phrase. And now that I don’t have complete strangers coming into my home fortnightly to judge me, I’ve sort of let some other things go. Like, I don’t really care if the coffee table gets cleared off because as soon as I clear it off, everyone dumps more crap on it, so screw it. No one ever visits us anyway.

Well, I’d like to think I’ll talk to you gentle readers again before my surgery, but considering this is my first post in about a month, I advise against holding your breath. Who knows when we shall meet again? But I promise you that if I end up with a freakshow jaw, I will blog about it. Never you fear. My friends, adieu.

Because I’ve got nothing better to do with my time, and it’s about time I faced it.

Today I woke up especially tired. I thought I would lie down for a nap as soon as the last kid left for school, but by then I was distracted by some other stuff, i.e. the internet, and then I thought, “You know, maybe I’m not that tired after all, maybe I should just stay up. That would be better for me.” But then around 10:50 a.m. I realized that I just wasn’t going to make it if I didn’t lie down and have a nap. But I didn’t want to sleep the rest of the school day away, so I set the kitchen timer for 40 minutes because shorter naps are supposed to be better for you anyway. Then I lay down on the couch, and it felt good to lie down, i.e. it felt much better than standing up or sitting down and certainly better than moving, but I couldn’t get to sleep. I think my feet were too cold. I hadn’t put on socks this morning. When I realized that my feet were freezing, I should have gotten up and just put on some socks, but it felt so good to be lying down instead of standing up and moving that I just continued lying there and thinking, “I’m curled up under a blanket. Eventually my feet have to warm up.” But no, actually, they don’t. And they didn’t. But eventually I got comfortable enough, even with cold feet, that even though I was not asleep, I was definitely very relaxed, and that was a super-good feeling.

It was around this time that the kitchen timer went off, and I thought to myself, “It feels too good to be lying down to get up and turn off that timer. I’m just going to keep lying here until I feel like getting up.” I would not have been able to tell myself this if my kitchen timer were the type that just keeps beeping until you turn it off. It beeps three long beeps, and then it shuts up for, like, a minute, and then it beeps three long beeps again, and it just keeps doing that until you turn it off. It really is just as annoying as it sounds, but when you’re super comfortable on the couch and don’t want to stand up, you talk yourself into thinking it’s not that annoying. And it was a little less annoying about 10-15 minutes later, when I finally thought to pull the blanket over my head. (Between my good ear being stuffed up next to the pillow and my bad ear being bad, this was more effective than it ought to have been.) But eventually it did get to be too much. The good news is that by the time I got off the couch and turned off the timer, it was not quite noon. That was a full half hour earlier than I expected it to be.

If I hadn’t insisted on 25 minutes of intermittent high-pitched beeping, I might actually have fallen asleep and taken an actual nap, but despite having not actually slept, I did feel much better than I did prior to lying down, so I considered the exercise a success. I use the word exercise loosely, of course. Perhaps if I had tried exercising instead of sleeping, I would have felt even better, and also like I had accomplished something. But then I wouldn’t have this scintillating story to tell my loyal blog readers.

What happened next? Well, I’ll give you a hint: it involved dishes, a dishwasher, a peanut butter sandwich, and an episode of Law & Order:SVU. I started binge-watching SVU (again–these things are cyclical) on the Netflix a couple weeks ago when my husband was either out of town or away from home most nights (doing what, you might ask? you wouldn’t believe me if I told you, but okay, he joined an Andean folk rock band and they’ve been rehearsing a lot–see, I told you you wouldn’t believe me), and I got kind of addicted to it, to the point where I sometimes watch it during the day while folding laundry during the day while the kids are in school. I almost never watched television while the kids are in school. It seems like such a waste of time; in point of fact, it is a waste of time. This is why I can never manage to watch my Netflix DVDs because when else am I going to watch a DVD except while the kids are in school? This is why it is a waste of money for me to still get Netflix DVDs, but I can’t bring myself to quit because I really do want to watch Howard’s End, eventually.

I know a lot of people don’t like SVU because they just get sick of all the rape. But there isn’t actually that much rape on SVU. It’s probably more kidnapping than anything else. Sometimes the kidnapping does get tiresome. I don’t think of myself as a person who enjoys television shows about rape. I’m actually super-uncomfortable with seeing rape in my entertainment selections, but I do love me some Law & Order (it began while I was in college, but it became really serious once Sam Waterston joined the cast of the original series, and I fancied myself in love with Sam Waterston for many years until just recently when I realized he was older than my dad–by like, a lot–and why that bothered me so much, I can’t be sure, but I haven’t felt the same about him since), and I love the cast of SVU. I like Richard Belzer better on SVU than I ever liked him on Homicide, and I loved Homicide (mostly because of Andre Braugher, a little bit because of Kyle Secor, I admit it, I’m not above that). Richard Belzer has done some surprisingly nuanced work on SVU. But what I really love is Ice-T. Ice-T is awesome on that show. (Tangentially related aside: I also love this guy talking about Ice-T on SVU.) But I enjoy the whole cast, even without Christopher Meloni. So enough justifying my Law & Order obsession. I shouldn’t love Law & Order as much as I do, since it tends to glorify abuses of government power, but screw it, not everything has to be political. AT LEAST I KNOW IT’S A FANTASY. Okay. Why did I mention SVU? Because I was watching SVU–and eating popcorn, if you must know–and this particular episode actually made me cry. It was the one where Patricia Arquette plays an aging hooker (an aged hooker, really) and Mariska Hargitay is trying to get her off the streets FINALLY. It was surprisingly touching. That, or I am becoming emotionally unstable, which I will also buy.

It wasn’t even an Ice-T-centric episode.

But back to my emotional stability or lack thereof. I saw my psychiatrist on April Fool’s Day (no joke here, that’s just how I remembered the appointment and why I continue to remember it long after I kept it), and it was because I needed new prescriptions because we changed insurance in January and it’s a long story–I hadn’t seen her in a long time because I haven’t really needed to talk about anything. Since my PMS was magically cured (with SuperGyno science), I pretty much walk around like a regular human being, albeit a heavily drugged one. So I wasn’t sure what I was going to talk with her about except that I needed new prescriptions, but I ended up talking about how I’m having a midlife crisis.

I used to talk about midlife crises very cavalierly. When I was a teenager, I thought I could write a memoir and call it I Was a Teenage Midlife Crisis because I was always having an existential crisis of some kind, and also I didn’t particularly expect to live past the age of 30. (This was mostly a result of my Cold War-era Mormonism. It took the Berlin Wall coming down and a major rearrangement of my personal theology to undo such fatalism. Although I still haven’t quite worked my brain around the idea that I might live to have grandchildren. I know I’ve told you this before, but maybe some of you are just now joining the program, or maybe you were absent that day.) I know all teenagers have existential crises all the time, but mine were much more serious because they started in grade school and also, I was just a piece of work. Anyway. Oh, yeah–I used to throw that term “midlife crisis” around like it was nothing, but I have finally reached a stage of life where I might technically actually be having a midlife crisis. I am almost (very close!) 44, and the fall of communism notwithstanding, I think a life expectancy of 88 is more than optimistic. I could technically be having an end-of-life crisis, for all I know. In eight and a half years, I will have lived longer than my mother did. I’m not really hyper-aware of my own mortality, I’m just saying ANYTHING CAN HAPPEN.

Regardless of how long I have left to live, the fact remains that I have lived for (almost! very close!) 44 years, and I have nothing to show for it, aside from this beautiful family. But looks aren’t everything. Certainly, as a teenager, especially one who didn’t expect to live past 30, I expected a lot more out of my adult self. I am certainly not where I thought I would be at this point of the game. I am not remotely close. I am pretty much a failure, and I don’t say that in some dramatic way like you have to talk me off a ledge–I’m having a crisis, but thanks to modern medicine, it is a very calm crisis. It doesn’t make it less depressing, just less…urgent, shall we say. I mean, whatever. I’ll still be here with the same problems tomorrow. Back to my story, if I were a dude, I’d be buying a sports car or having an affair. I guess. Since I’m not a dude, and it’s pretty clear that I will never realize my dreams at the rate I’m going, i.e. not at all, I am trying to switch dreams midstream–only I’m out of dream ideas. I thought about becoming an accountant, but the more I thought about it, the more I thought I wouldn’t be as good at it as I thought I would. Maybe I just can’t face the possibility that I might suck as much at being an accountant as I have at being a writer. That’s possible. I’m really good at avoiding things. If it were a career, I’d be at the top of my field.


October 2015
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