A Sudden, Fearful Death by Anne Perry
This is book 4 in the William Monk series. I reviewed the first three books (plus book 8, since I started out of order) in the last installment of our little book club, and if you were there for that, you know that I FREAKING LOVE THIS SERIES. William Monk is an amnesiac detective in Victorian England. He lost his memory in a carriage accident and has been slowly piecing together who he is by observation, deduction, and the occasional flashback which breaks through the wall of his consciousness at inopportune times. He often works with nurse Hester Latterly, a willful, independent lady who is not at all his cup of tea, but is nevertheless his most loyal friend. Also in the mix is Oliver Rathbone, a prestigious barrister who helps in the pursuit of justice.

The plot of this book centers on Prudence Barrymore, a talented and ambitious nurse (she wanted to be a doctor, at a time when women were not admitted into medical schools) who has been strangled at the hospital where Hester is currently working. Who would have strangled Prudence and thrown her down a laundry chute? Was it some madman who found his way into the hospital? Was it another nurse who was jealous of her abilities? Was it a doctor who thought she was too uppity for her own good? (Hester wouldn’t know anything about that, lol.) This was a good story, but I did think everyone spent an inordinate amount of time befuddled and utterly missing the key to solving the mystery; I mean, I know they were Victorians and their thought processes were subject to their worldview, but HELLO, MCFLY, WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT PRUDENCE? SHE WANTED TO BE A DOCTOR! But, you know, that’s part of this series’ charm, the fact that they’re all Victorians who, despite their relative sophistication, still have trouble wrapping their heads around some things. 4/5 stars

The Sins of the Wolf by Anne Perry
Monk #6, and this time–you’ll never guess–Hester herself has been framed for the murder of one of her patients. The victim was an elderly woman whose family are sure a bunch of odd ducks, almost all of whom had some plausible motive for killing her. The one person we know didn’t do it is Hester. Can Monk and Rathbone prove her innocence in time? Complicating matters is the fact that the crime technically took place in Scotland, so she has to be tried by the Scottish justice system. Och! This is a very exciting book with lots of intrigue and recurring-character development (best appreciated if you’ve read the previous five books). The climax is action-packed and INSANE. But also glorious. 5/5 stars

Cain His Brother by Anne Perry
Monk #7. Businessman Angus Stonefield has gone missing; his wife, worried for his safety, hires Monk to find him. Actually, what she fears is that his brother, Caleb–a violent man who prefers a life on the streets to respectable work–has murdered him. Monk finds evidence that indicates foul play was most likely, but he needs to find proof of death so that Stonefield’s widow can have his estate settled. Turns out what is really going on is much weirder than anyone could have guessed. I mean, really weird. But interesting. 4/5 stars

Weighed in the Balance by Anne Perry
Monk #7. Rathbone agrees to defend Countess Zorah Rostova against a charge of slander. She says the onetime ruler of her small German principality was murdered by his own wife, who was responsible for his exile to Venice years ago. (She wasn’t the girl his mom wanted for him.) No one has any evidence of this. Rathbone doesn’t even know why he took the case, but he hopes Monk can figure out who really did it. This requires him to travel to Venice and examine the prince’s past acquaintances. I found the German politics alternately fascinating and tedious. But Perry has a way of holding my interest even when I don’t want to be interested. 4/5 stars

A Breach of Promise by Anne Perry
Are you starting to get the picture here? I’m really extremely fond of this series. And I am really extremely fond of this particular book. It’s #9. (Recall that I had already read #8 out of order, but I re-read it right before starting this one.) Rathbone has taken on another hopeless case–will the man ever learn? (Signs point to no.) Killian Melville is a gifted architect–a genius, really–who has found himself unwittingly engaged to the daughter of one of his wealthy patrons. No offense to the girl–whose name is Zillah, if you can believe that–she’s perfectly lovely, but he does not want to marry her, he cannot marry her, and he will not marry her. He won’t say why, which frustrates Rathbone no end, but perhaps Monk can figure it out.

There is a plot twist about half-ish-way through, so I can’t say much more, but much of the book is a commentary on the status of women during this time. Plot-wise, coincidence plays a bigger role than usual in the resolution–the willing suspension of disbelief is stretched quite a bit, but I decided it made for a great story, so screw it. Also–no spoilers, but the ending of this book was so good. The last page was worth a whole extra star by itself. I’m a sucker for that crap. 5/5 stars

The Twisted Root by Anne Perry
Monk #10. A young man hires Monk to find his fiancee, who fled a garden party at his family’s home and hasn’t been seen since. Monk tracks down the carriage the woman left in, and nearby he finds the coachman, who has been murdered. Why did the woman change her mind about the marriage? What did she learn that made her get such terribly cold feet–and did it lead to cold-blooded murder?? Well. Remember when I said that situation in Cain His Brother turned out to be much weirder than anyone suspected? I was just kidding. This situation is REALLY MUCH WEIRDER than anyone suspected. 4/5 stars

Slaves of Obsession by Anne Perry
Monk #11. Monk and Hester must travel to America on the eve of the Civil War to find a young lady who has eloped with the Union soldier who may have murdered her father, an arms dealer who had agreed to sell weapons to the Confederacy. But did he really do it? It sure looks like it, and he’s kind of a douchebag, so we all want to believe he did it, but he insists he’s innocent, and his fiancee (they didn’t quite complete the elopement) refuses to doubt him. They both end up getting prosecuted for the father’s murder, and Rathbone agrees to defend them. Well, it wouldn’t be the first time Monk has worked both sides of a case. This book deals with some interesting ethical questions–how far should one go when fighting for a cause, particularly when the cause has already lead to war? 5/5 stars

Funeral in Blue by Anne Perry
Monk #12. Two women are found strangled in an artist’s apartment. One of them is the wife of Dr. Kristian Beck, a Bohemian doctor Monk knows through Hester and his erstwhile benefactress, Lady Callandra Daviot. Dr. Beck is arrested for both murders. Rathbone is off in France or Italy or some such place, so he’s not available to defend him. Fortunately, Beck’s father-in-law believes in his innocence enough that he’s willing to take the case himself. You have to admit, the optics are great. Monk, Hester, and Callandra are desperate to have Beck exonerated. Monk even travels to Vienna in the hope of discovering something from Beck and his wife’s past lives as revolutionaries (!) that will shed light on the murders. This was a riveting read, right up until the end, which came out of literally freaking nowhere. After all those plot twists and turns, I felt a tad ripped-off. I would recommend this book for die-hard Monk fans and Monk completists only. Of which I am one. 3/5 stars

Death of a Stranger by Anne Perry
Monk #13. This is the book where Monk finally finds out the truth about his past. He’s learned bits and pieces over the years, but now a case involving a railroad company and fraud intersects with a past case in which he was a star player. Was Monk himself guilty of fraud, as a businessman–or of an even worse betrayal? How will the knowledge of who he once was affect who he is now? A reasonably satisfying resolution to this long-standing mystery. And yes, he still has amnesia. 4/5 stars

And no, this isn’t the end of the Monk series. But it is the end of this blog post and the psycho-killers edition of this installment. Or the psycho-killers installment of this edition. Next time: Romance!

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